Submitted work by JulieR

Analyzing Objects

Porcelain

Musket Ball

Smallpox

Nail

Reaper

Shirtwaist

Transistor

Coffee

Record

Tire

Dishwasher

Dress

Stereograph

Stone

Mail

Shoe

Question 1:
Historical thinking is the reading, analysis, and writing necessary for telling the stories of history. Historical thinking involves investigating questions, analyzing sources, considering multiple perspectives, grappling with complex issues, and developing interpretations.
Question 2:
Photos, written documents, artifacts, posters, maps, cartoons, videos, sound recordings and many other objects stimulate the senses, which is essential for addressing the learning styles of my students with autism.
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Module Id: 689
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
Historical thinking is the reading, analysis, and writing necessary for telling the stories of history. Historical thinking involves investigating questions, analyzing sources, considering multiple perspectives, grappling with complex issues, and developing interpretations.
Question 2:
Photos, written documents, artifacts, posters, maps, cartoons, videos, sound recordings and many other objects stimulate the senses, which is essential for addressing the learning styles of my students with autism.
Redirect: /content/what-historical-thinking
Module Id: 689
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
It looks like a very old, grey, white, black, green, weathered, beaten up solid rectangular cube stone ground marker etched with two lines of nearly legible words on the front. The top line ends with O N, and has a capital R scratched onto the surface above the original engraved first or second letters. There is a crack a couple inches left of the center that runs over the top,and about half way down the face. The top portion is angled inwards on each side to make the flat top smaller than the area of the base. There is dried up mulch under and around it, some leaves and a few thick green strands of grass in the front; as well as a row of vertical narrow black poles stuck in the mulch behind it. There is green cut grass surrounding what can be seen of the mulch several inches behind the black fence poles in back.
Question 2:
Markers and monuments are existing parts of history, placed on or near where momentous events occurred. The markers pinpoint where historically remarkable people are buried, and where locations of historical importance are memorialized.
Redirect: /content/stone-resources
Module Id: 1039
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
It looks like a very old, grey, white, black, green, weathered, beaten up solid rectangular cube stone ground marker etched with two lines of nearly legible words on the front. The top line ends with O N, and has a capital R scratched onto the surface above the original engraved first or second letters. There is a crack a couple inches left of the center that runs over the top,and about half way down the face. The top portion is angled inwards on each side to make the flat top smaller than the area of the base. There is dried up mulch under and around it, some leaves and a few thick green strands of grass in the front; as well as a row of vertical narrow black poles stuck in the mulch behind it. There is green cut grass surrounding what can be seen of the mulch several inches behind the black fence poles in back.
Question 2:
Markers and monuments are existing parts of history, placed on or near where momentous events occurred. The markers pinpoint where historically remarkable people are buried, and where locations of historical importance are memorialized.
Redirect: /content/stone-resources
Module Id: 1039
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
I notice it is a light color vertically striped, long sleeved, ladies blouse, with a banded collar, three buttons down the front, and a narrow strip of material tightened (belt?)around the waist portion of the blouse.
Question 2:
It could have something to do with the textile industry/industrialization. It could relate to women's fashions. It could have possibly been a blouse worn by someone famous. It could also be the top to a uniform, like a nurse or house keeper.
Redirect: /content/shirtwaist-resources
Module Id: 950
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
It looks like it's a long skirted, white cotton, loosely-fit dress suit; as the lady may be wearing a thin jacket over her white blouse. The sleeves of the blouse and the jacket aren't quite full length. There is a darker colored sash hanging from the left breast of her jacket. I think the words on the sash say WOMAN SUFFRAGETTE.
Question 2:
It definitely connects to the theme of women's rights, and the fight for what became the 19th amendment
It also connects to the inequality of women's status in society.
Redirect: /content/dress-resources
Module Id: 1075
User Id: 1464
Question 1: Looks like pile of old skinny tires stacked up outside a factory.
Question 2:
It could relate to manufacturing tires, the disposal of, or recycling of rubber, or with the vehicle manufacturing industry.
Redirect: /content/tire-resources
Module Id: 1108
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
Historical thinking is an instructional method that centers on utilizing primary sources to provide learners with clear, unbiased, meaningful, and concrete samples of historical accounts which award learners with more thought-out,
interesting, and realistic pictures of the past.
Question 2:
Using objects, I can help my students successfully search for answers regarding the significance and importance of their roles in the shaping of our history.
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Module Id: 689
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
To me, the boundary stone connects the following:
First, the ironic, essential roles of slaves and slave descendants who were involved in the planning, development, and construction of Washington DC. For example, Benjamin Banneker was a respected contributor, and was called upon by Andrew Ellicott to assist in the surveying of the territory.
Second, it is ironic that owners considered slaves as their "property". The federal government rented slaves from owners to develop the property that is now our capital city. In other words, construction of the city of Washington, on our government's most cherished property, would not have succeeded if not for the rental of slaves; the human "property" of the white men.
Question 2:
One way students can explore how boundaries have changed over the course of history is to look at the forced relocation of Native American tribes from their home lands onto portioned out lands assigned to them by the federal government.
Another way to study boundary changes is to look at how segregation changed boundaries in the everyday lives of black people. For example boundaries were set requiring them to attend different schools. sit in assigned areas of public places, and drink from different fountains,,
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Module Id: 1039
User Id: 1464
Question 1:
The dress connects as a symbol of the first women's rights convention. The Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 was organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Another connection the dress can symbolize is the impact that public demonstrations (past and present) have on everyone participating and observing, including both the supporters and the opposition. The National Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington DC on March 3, 1913 involved 8,000 women marching down Pennsylvania Ave. It was one day before President Wilson's inauguration. Law enforcement officers in charge of maintaining a peaceful demonstration, which included close to half a million onlookers, failed to provide safety and order throughout the event. As a result, men poured into the street in protest. Marchers were slapped, spit on, knocked to the ground, and verbally assaulted.
Sounds familiar!!
Question 2:
I'd examine documentaries available on cable and streaming platforms, as well as Hollywood productions like "Iron Jawed Angels" and "Suffragette", among others.
Redirect: /content/dress-connections-essay
Module Id: 1075
User Id: 1464
Title: Who Knew?!?!
Grade Level: Middle
Short Answer:
Students will complete KWL charts pertaining to a grade level history standard. Provide feedback, then have them set it aside. Next, present the students with two or three specific primary sources/objects relative to our topic. For each object, let the students work with a partner to study the objects and complete 5 Ws graphic organizers, while continuing to provide feedback and support. Finally, return to the completed KWL charts to discuss, compare, and contrast.
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Module Id: 689
User Id: 1464
Title: Out of Bounds
Grade Level: Middle
Short Answer:
Display the photo of the boundary marker on the Promethean board to use as a model. Give each student modeling clay and have them create mini markers that will then be placed on a blank map with Xs surrounding an unidentified/undetailed location.Once each student has placed their clay model markers on the Xs, divide students into pairs. Provide each set of students with photos of DC's most familiar landmarks, and some additional clay. Ask them to create replicas of the symbolic monuments and landmarks that will reveal the identity of the city their clay boundary markers surround.
Redirect: /content/stone-wrap
Module Id: 1039
User Id: 1464