Submitted work by SkylarW

Analyzing Objects

Porcelain

Musket Ball

Smallpox

Nail

Reaper

Shirtwaist

Transistor

Coffee

Record

Tire

Dishwasher

Dress

Stereograph

Stone

Mail

Shoe

Question 1:
Historical thinking is a way to analyze people, places, and events. In order to think historically, people need to consider elements of the context and draw connections. For example, what caused an event to occur, how did people of that time react, and did it change anything.
Question 2:
Objects could be a great resource to encourage historical thinking, especially for hands-on learners. Instead of (or in addition to) reading a primary source, students could examine an object and answer questions about it. The questions could guide students into using historical thinking skills. I also believe this could foster a sense of curiosity because students would be able to hold and touch the object rather than read a passage.
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Module Id: 689
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Question 1:
This stone is weathered, or chipped. It has moss or some other plant-life growing on it. There are some words carved into the front of the stone, and it is in front of what looks like a gate.
Question 2:
This object could be a marker for something. I do not think it is a gravestone, but something of a similar purpose. The stone could denote an important event, person, or motto that ties into American history.
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Question 1:
This object looks like a woman's shirt, based on the design and how much it is taken in at the waist.
Question 2:
This could be a shirt from around the 1900's and connect to either factory work or women's rights.
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Question 1:
The object has smudges, either blobs or pencil-like marks. None of the smudges are identical, but each blob has at least a partial lining and some variation of darkness.
Question 2:
I really have no clue what this object is, but I think it relates to something in the field of science.
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Question 1:
The object has smudges, either blobs or pencil-like marks. None of the smudges are identical, but each blob has at least a partial lining and some variation of darkness.
Question 2:
I really have no clue what this object is, but I think it relates to something in the field of science because it looks like something that would be seen under a microscope.
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Question 1:
This object has three components. It looks like its made of metal. There is a blank background and a light source casting shadows.
Question 2:
This object looks like it is space related, so it could connect to space exploration and the Space Race.
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Module Id: 1146
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Question 1:
This object is an envelope or letter from the auditor's office in the Confederate States.
Question 2:
This object might connect to to the secession and creation of the Confederate States, the Civil War, and the governments during the Civil War.
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Question 1:
The objects look like similar objects, but with slight differences in size and tip shape. They also look worn/rusted.
Question 2:
This might connect to the migration of people or the economy because the objects look like they were used to build things.
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Question 1: The shoes are worn. The shoes are made from leather (?) even the strings.
Question 2:
These shoes could connect to broader themes by who would of worn them (suffragettes? soldiers?). The shoes could also be connected to economics, depending on how they were produced.
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Question 1: The object appears to be a magnifying lens.
Question 2:
The object could connect to the medical or scientific field with magnifying lenses. The object could also connect to something related to a human's improved ability to see.
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Question 1: This object looks like an early record.
Question 2:
This object could connect to socioeconomic status, such as owning one of the devices was a symbol of wealth. This could also connect to the power of the government and lead into the creation of the radio and Fireside Chats.
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Question 1:
Historical thinking breaks history down. Instead of just remember names and dates, historical thinking is a process to analyze the context of history.
Question 2:
Objects can be used to encourage historical thinking by having students think, form hypothesis, and connect the dots. By using objects, students are looking at primary sources, or at least replicas of them, and using a sense of context clues to figure out the historical context.
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Question 1:
The stone relates to the formation of the capital, Washington's presidency, and eventually slavery and tensions in the nation around the Civil War.
Question 2:
Students could compare maps and city plans to visually see how boundaries changed. Other objects, like the House bill in the thumbnails, could be used for supporting details and give students clues.
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Question 1:
This shirt connects to women's rights, industrialization, and worker's reform movements. The shirt design restricts motion less, which allowed women to be more active, which increased women getting jobs. From there, this connects to industrialization and specifically the Triangle Shirt Factory. The Triangle Shirt Factory is a tragic example of the early working conditions, but one that leads to labor reform movements.
Question 2:
Did workers sign contracts? Was there an interview process? Could workers move up in the company? When were regulations passed for labor and worker safety? Where were the company/factory owners during the workday?
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Question 1:
This shirt connects to women's rights, industrialization, and worker's reform movements. The shirt design restricts motion less, which allowed women to be more active, which increased women getting jobs. From there, this connects to industrialization and specifically the Triangle Shirt Factory. The Triangle Shirt Factory is a tragic example of the early working conditions, but one that leads to labor reform movements.
Question 2:
Did workers sign contracts? Was there an interview process? Could workers move up in the company? When were regulations passed for labor and worker safety? Where were the company/factory owners during the workday?
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Question 1:
Smallpox connects to exploration and settlement of the Americas, colonial life, the American Revolution, and then scientific advancements. Probably most known is that a large percent of of the Indian population died from diseases brought over from Europeans, specifically smallpox. Smallpox also connects to colonial life it killed many people, and as a result effected trade. Perhaps the most interesting connection is the concept of inoculation, especially Washington's decision to inoculate troops during the American Revolution. Lastly, smallpox relates to the development of vaccinations.
Question 2:
I think using disease would help build critical thinking skills because students would work on drawing connections and looking at cause and effect. Another benefit is that students would be able to relate to the content, especially following the coronavirus. A drawback could be you might have to be selective about which disease you use.
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Question 1:
The transistor relates to technology, global trade/economics, and demographics. The transistor shows how communication and technology changed and improved from the invention of the light bulb and telegraph wires to modern-day computers, DVDs, and phones. The transistor also relates to the economy and global trade because it was used by the original telephone company (eventually AT&T), and then we get to modern-day with Japan started making all the Sony products. Lastly, the transistor relates to why California is a technology hub, thanks to Stanford University.
Question 2:
I would like students to answer questions that leads them to figuring out how the technologies worked. Then they could apply their knowledge and think of how other technologies operate, and if any were influenced by these patents.
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Question 1:
This object connects to social and political issues in American history. Socially, the object connects to the debate of slavery. The Confederacy sees slavery as the base for their agricultural economy, while many in the North see it as morally wrong. Politically, the object connects to states' rights versus the federal government. In this module, we specifically looked at the role of the post office, a function of the federal government, and the spread of abolitionist materials. Distribution could not be stopped, because of the freedoms granted in the first amendment, so the Confederacy just did not further distribute the materials.
Question 2:
This module enhanced my prior understanding by explaining the view of slavery in the 1700's and by giving a specific example of the tension. I already understood the 1800's view of slavery, but I liked that this module explained that during the 1700's, slavery was thought of an "evil" existing institution which could gradually end. In regards to states rights, this module gave me a specific example to explain the rising tensions. I understood the expansion of slavery, the compromises, and growing abolitionist sentiment all contributed to rising tensions, but the module showed how all of these issues culminated into actual actions, not just ideas.
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Question 1:
The mass-produced nail connects to how people lived, expansion, and industrialization. First, nails were expensive until they were mass produced. As a result, many common people opted to live in houses constructed by wood (log cabins) or stones. Also, the log cabin became a symbol for American history, and a symbol for politics during the 1840's. The price of nails burdened America's growing and expanding population because people had to find other ways to build houses, the following are examples of houses: slightly uncomfortable (but inexpensive)log cabins, more stable (but more expensive) stone house and beam houses. The nail also relates to industrialization because it became massed produced.
Question 2:
The story of the nail relates to the incentive of settlers moving west for land, such as the Homestead Act.
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Question 1:
The shoes connect to the Civil War because those are a pair of soldier shoes. The shoes also connect to the growing power of the federal government because the government was responsible for supplying the army. In addition to supplying the army, federal agents were created in inspect the quality of goods, income tax, the draft, and paper money were introduced.
Question 2:
Diary excerpts would be a great primary source, especially comparing some from various perspectives. Any documentation about the draft or federal orders regarding the army (and then juxtaposed to the citizens' reactions) would be helpful to use.
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Question 1:
The stereoscope connects socially, culturally, and politically. The stereoscope was one of the objects to own to show socio-economic status. If you were middle or upper class, you more than likely owned a stereoscope. Culturally, the stereoscopes used photos and wordings to shape values. Symbols of American and freedom, like the flag were often capture to revive the patriotic spirit of America and freedom. Politically, the stereoscope allowed more people to see the president, such as with Teddy Roosevelt's Trust speech.
Question 2:
Students could compare images from different technologies, while making notes of themes, quality, intended audience, and audiences reached.
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Question 1:
The song connects to immigration, especially assimilation. During the height of immigration, it was the belief that all the cultures would mix and create a new American culture, which the song references with "melting pot." Furthermore, the song mentions that the children of the immigrants would have a life of opportunities, such as being the next president, which connects to the hope the families had of bettering their condition in America.
Question 2:
Diaries of immigrants would be super informative to understand the perspective of immigrants and what they faced once in America. Caricatures or newspaper clippings would also be beneficial because students could see how Americans were addressing immigration, both positive and negative views.
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Title: Analyzing Objects - Classroom Connections
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
I would use the approach Elspeth Inglis used with the candlestick maker. Even though her audience was most likely elementary school aged, I believe the approach would be effective at the high school level as well. By examining the object, students would be using historical thinking and critical thinking skills. Usually I have students analyze documents, but using an object would help the students connect, visualize, and understand the time period. This would be a great warm-up/bell ringer or introduction to the daily lesson.
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Title: Drawing Connections
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
I try to emphasize that history is just not knowing names and dates, but is a story with themes waiting to be analyzed. I would love to use this content to help students draw connections and realize the impact slavery had on the nation. We have already covered slavery was introduced in Jamestown, but slavery is put on the back-burner until the events leading up to the Civil War. Since the students learned about the Residency Act, I would show the image of the stone and have students observe and then guess what it was. The students could then examine the supporting documents that were used in the thumbnails. By examining those sources, students will be able to bridge what they know and see that the issue of slavery extended into areas not usually thought about. This would be a great bell ringer that serves as both review, an introduction, and extension activity.
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Title: Drawing Connections
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
I am working with my students to relate elements, explain cause and effect, and compare and contrast people, events, or concepts. All of these tasks sound pretty basic, but my high schoolers have trouble doing this in a historical context. I would put the picture of the triangle shirt on the board or print it out for them to individually have. Then I would ask them to write what concepts in history this shirt could connect to. After some students share their answers, I might give them a hint and tell them this is from the 1900's to get them thinking more. Since they are in high school, they should have learned about industrialization in middle school and be somewhat familiar with the topic. From there, I would pass out the pictures with paragraphs from the module and have them read them independently. I would also pass out some graphic organizers so after reading, the students could process the cause and effect and piece the information together. As a class, we would then discuss how the shirt fits into history.
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Module Id: 950
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Title: Past, Present, Future
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
This content is super appropriate to today's coronavirus pandemic. Since we are doing remote learning, it would be interesting to create a questionnaire or discussion post and ask for students' views on coronavirus and how it effects them and the world today.Then the students could analyze the content about smallpox. Maybe given some additional resources on corona, the students could then compare the viruses, and then brainstorm possibilities of what will happen in the future regarding coronavirus or another virus/disease that pops up.
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Title: Cross-curricular Investigations
Grade Level: Middle
Short Answer:
Using the content from this model would be a great way to engage students who like science, technology, or hands-on tasks. For a warm up, students could jot down a quick history/evolution of communication/technology. Most students might mention letters, the telephone, and then cell phones and computers. After reviewing their responses, students could break up and go to different stations and have a "how it works" simulation. Students could analyze the content while recording responses on what the object is, how it works, the predecessor, and next generation model. At the end, the class could come together and have a discussion of how these technologies shaped modern-day America by looking at pictures and graphs.
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Module Id: 1146
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Title: States vs. Federal Government
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
I would use this content as an enrichment activity after discussing the tensions leading to the Civil War. Students would already have notes and an understanding of the sectional tensions and be familiar with the prominent abolitionists. I would then give the students a handout with a picture of the post-office and a description of the situation that occurred. The students would have several questions to answer to get them thinking about federal versus state governments and each section's point of view. Then, as a class we would discuss their thoughts.
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Title: Construction Simulation
Grade Level: Middle
Short Answer:
This is probably going to be over elaborate, but gives the students a chance to be hands on. I would break the room into several sections to represent different times in history. Students would be in groups and remain at one station for the simulation. Based on the time period, I would give students materials to construct a house (playing cards, Legos, etc.). Each station would have a description of the time and directions, for example some stations may require students to transport materials, so they would have to calculate added costs. The students would have 5-10 minutes to build a house with their materials based on the direction. After the time is up, the class would rate the stability of each house, compare materials, location, and expenses. As a class, we could discuss the similarities and differences. I would show the classes each type of house each station represented. After explaining the real-life models, I would ask the students if they could pick out which item impacted housing construction the most. From there, we could discuss the nail and how it impacted westward expansion.
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Module Id: 953
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Title: Item based question
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
I would use the content in this module to create a spin-off of DBQ. After a lesson on the Civil War, this could be an enrichment activity and formative check for students to understand the role of the government during the Civil War. From the lesson, students would already have knowledge of the growing federal government power. I would give them the content in this module. Each piece would have an explanation to help their understanding. As the students went through and analyzed the content, they would answer one or two questions about each item. At the end, they would write a paragraph (perhaps more) explaining how the role of the government changed, especially in regards to government-citizen relations.
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Module Id: 1002
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Title: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
As a warm up, students would have a picture to analyze. Some example questions would be "What is the purpose of this photograph?" "Who is the intended audience?" "What broad theme could this photo be related to?" After discussing the warm-up, I would summarize the role of the stereograph. Students would then be broken into groups to compile several pictures "stereograph slides" of an event/country/etc. and have to come up with a caption. The task would be to use the photos and captions to describe how they want to market the event. Then, the students would present their compilation and the class would try to decide what values the group was promoting, the purpose of their compilation, and their intended audience.
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Module Id: 1047
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Title: Full Story Investigation
Grade Level: High
Short Answer:
After addressing the textbook basics of immigration (why, where, how, who, the effects), the students will be given a task to decide if the narrative of immigration is true, or if it was more of a generalization. Students will be given several different primary sources from different perspectives to analyze. The students will then write a paragraph reporting their findings and citing the sources as evidence.
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Module Id: 1128
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